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25 Different Types and 7 Principles of Independent Software Testing

January 29, 2022

3:10 am

Independent software testing holds a critical role in the development process. The testing team should be completely separate from the product development team and the end-users, making them truly independent.

We recommend software quality assurance and software testing services for all our customers, as well as custom testing for individual components. Let’s learn more about the types and the principles of independent testing.

What Are the Types of Software Testing?

Software testing includes more than 100 different types, but each project will need different ones depending on the requirements. The two major categories of testing are functional and non-functional.

As the name suggests, functional testing verifies the functionality of the software in relation to the requirements or specifications. Non-functional testing covers other aspects of a software application, which may include compatibility, load, productivity, stress, security, volume, recovery, etc.

Software testing can also provide an objective, independent view of the software to allow the business to appreciate and understand the risks of software implementation.

What are the most common types of software testing services?

  1. Acceptance Testing: Performed by the client, Acceptance Testing verifies that the software works as outlined by the requirements. This is the last phase of testing as it is complete only when all functionality and features perform as expected.
  2. Accessibility Testing: This testing process performs various checks to ensure the software is accessible to people with disabilities. For example, the software may have an adjustable font size for visual impairments or color contrast for people with color blindness.
  3. Ad-hoc Testing: Ad-hoc Testing finds defects in the application by executing any flow of the application or any random functionality.
  4. Backend Testing: Sometimes also called Database Testing, Backend Testing involves testing table structure, schema, stored procedure, data structure, etc.
  5. Black Box Testing: Black Box Testing tests applications by just focusing on the inputs and outputs without considering their internal code implementation.
  6. Boundary Value Testing: This type of testing checks if defects exist at boundary values using an upper and lower boundary for each range.
  7. Browser Compatibility Testing: Used for web applications, Browser Compatibility Testing Service ensures the software can run in different browsers and operating systems, as well as in different versions of both.
  8. Compatibility Testing: Compatibility testing evaluates how software behaves and runs with different environments, web servers, hardware, and networks.
  9. Component Testing: Component Testing involves testing multiple functionalities as a single code, and its objective is to identify if any bugs occur after connecting those multiple functionalities with each other.
  10. Database Testing: These tests usually consist of a layered process, including the user interface layer, the business layer, the data access layer, and the database itself.
  11. Dominant Testing: The most common type of independent software testing, Dominant Testing identifies all possible defects before releasing software on the market.
  12. End-to-End Testing: Similar to System Testing, End-to-End Testing evaluates a complete application environment in a situation that mimics real-world use.
  13. Exploratory Testing: This service offers informal testing to explore the application and look for defects that exist in the application.
  14. Incremental Integration Testing: This approach requires continuous testing of an application when new functionality is added.
  15. Integration Testing: This service tests all integrated modules to verify the combined functionality after integration.
  16. Load Testing: Load Testing measures the response of the system under various load conditions.
  17. Object-Oriented Testing: This testing process evaluates the software using object-oriented paradigms like encapsulation, inheritance, polymorphism, etc.
  18. Performance Testing: Also called Stress or Load Testing, Performance Testing checks to ensure the software meets the performance requirements.
  19. Regression Testing: This testing practice ensures an application still functions as expected after any code changes, updates, or improvements.
  20. Security Testing: Performed by a special team, this service checks that the software application or website is secure from internal and external threats, as well as confirms the authorization and authentication processes.
  21. Smoke Testing: These preliminary tests are a subset of test cases that cover the most important functionality of a component or system, used to aid the assessment of whether the main functions of the software appear to work correctly.
  22. Stability Testing: Stability Testing determines if a new software version is performing well enough to accept it for a major testing effort or not.
  23. Stress Testing: This method determines the robustness of software by testing beyond the limits of normal operation. Stress testing is particularly important for “mission-critical” software but is used for all types of software.
  24. System Testing: Under System Testing, the entire system is tested based on overall requirement specifications.
  25. Unit Testing: This method tests individual units of source code, sets of one or more computer program modules together with associated control data, usage procedures, and operating procedures.

Note that these software tests are used for different projects, and for different phases of a project. They also will change if the requirements and scope of the project change.

What Are the Seven Principles of Software Testing?

The seven principles of software testing refer to the guidelines that help testing teams maximize their time and effort to discover the hidden effects of a testing project.

What Are the Seven Principles of Software Testing?

1. Testing indicates the present defects of the project

Testing is about the presence of defects, not their absence. Software testing can only find the defects that exist in an application or software. Despite the thorough testing of a product or application, no one can ensure the product is 100% defect-free.

2. Exhaustive testing is not possible

Project timelines make it impossible to test all the combinations of data, inputs, and test scenarios. Instead, the testing team must focus on important criteria such as risk and priorities to set up the test strategy.

3. Early testing

Testing activities must be conducted as soon as possible to get ready for the next stage of software development. Testers can start testing when the product requirements or documents are generated. Obviously, it is always easier and cheaper to fix issues in the early stages rather than making bigger changes later.

4. Defect clustering

Most defects are found in a few modules, so the testing team uses their knowledge and experience to identify the potential modules to test. That can help save time and effort as the team can focus on those areas.

5. Pesticide Paradox

The pesticide Paradox refers to the repetitive tests that are only applied in some limited modules instead of the whole system. This kind of test may prevent the discovery of new bugs outside those modules. It, therefore, requires testing teams to frequently review and update test cases in order to cover various sections of the projects.

6. Testing is context-dependent

Various products or projects contain different elements, features, and requirements. Hence, testers cannot apply the same test approach for different projects. For instance, an application in the banking industry will require different testing than a video game.

7. The absence of errors fallacy

If the testing didn’t find any bugs in the software, the product is not necessarily ready to be released since it must be confirmed the testing was conducted thoroughly with the right requirements.

InApp’s in-house Independent Software Testing department provides full-cycle quality assurance and testing services, as well as custom testing for individual components. Our certified ISTQB professionals use established testing protocols for each stage of your software product lifecycle, including development, implementation, and maintenance.

Contact us to learn more about how we can help with your project.

FAQs

What are SDLC and STLC?

Software Development Life Cycle (SDLC) is a development methodology, whereas Software Testing Life Cycle (STLC) is a testing methodology. SDLC covers the software development cycles, whereas STLC covers the testing cycles. SDLC starts before the actual application has been created, but STLC starts when the actual application exists or a chunk of working software exists.

How many types of software testing services are there?

There are more than 100 different types of software testing services, but each project will need different ones depending on the requirements of the application. The most common types include Functional Testing, System Testing, Security Testing, Performance Testing, and Integration Testing. The testing team should be completely separate from the product development team and the end-users, making them truly independent.

What are the two main categories of software testing?

The two major categories of testing are functional and non-functional. As the name suggests, functional testing verifies the functionality of the software in relation to the requirements or specifications. Non-functional testing covers other aspects of a software application, which may include compatibility, load, productivity, stress, security, volume, recovery, etc.